Core: noun, the most important part of a thing, the essence; from the Latin cor, meaning heart.

Click for Front Page of Current Issue (Home)

 Volume 1.22 This View’s Poetry July 8, 2002 


    The Folly of being Comforted    
         
   

One that is ever kind said yesterday:
“Your well-belovèd’s hair has threads of grey,
And little shadows come about her eyes;
Time can but make it easier to be wise
Though now it seems impossible, and so
All that you need is patience.”
                                                 Heart cries, “No,
I have not a crumb of comfort, not a grain.
Time can but make her beauty over again:
Because of that great nobleness of hers
The fire that stirs about her, when she stirs,
Burns but more clearly. O she had not these ways
When all the wild summer was in her gaze.”

O heart! O heart! if she’d but turn her head,
You’d know the folly of being comforted.

   
         
    W. B. Yeats (1865-1939)    
   

Collected Works: Volume I: The Poems (1989) # 79
ed. Richard J. Finneran

   

    Never give all the Heart    
         
   

Never give all the heart, for love
Will hardly seem worth thinking of
To passionate women if it seem
Certain, and they never dream
That it fades out from kiss to kiss;
For everything that’s lovely is
But a brief, dreamy, kind delight.
O never give the heart outright,
For they, for all smooth lips can say,
Have given their hearts up to the play.
And who could play it well enough
If deaf and dumb and blind with love?
He that made this knows all the cost,
For he gave all his heart and lost.

   
         
    W. B. Yeats (1865-1939)    
   

Collected Works: Volume I: The Poems (1989) # 81
ed. Richard J. Finneran

   

    O do not Love Too Long    
         
   

Sweetheart, do not love too long:
I loved long and long,
And grew to be out of fashion
Like an old song.

All through the years of our youth
Neither could have known
Their own thought from the other’s,
We were so much at one.

But O, in a minute she changed —
O do not love too long,
Or you will grow out of fashion
Like an old song.

   
         
    W. B. Yeats (1865-1939)    
    Collected Works: Volume I: The Poems (1989) # 88
ed. Richard J. Finneran

   

    Triad    
         
    From the Silence of Time, Time’s Silence borrow.
In the heart of To-day is the word of To-morrow.
The Builders of Joy are the Children of Sorrow.
   
         
    William Sharp (1856-1902)    
    Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse p. 400    



 Volume 1.22 This View’s Poetry July 8, 2002 





The View from the Core, and all original material, © E. L. Core 2002. All rights reserved.

Cor ad cor loquitur J. H. Newman — “Heart speaks to heart”